CENTRAL VIETNAM COUNTRYSIDE



Central countryside welcome tourists
.

The Truong Son route, known as the Ho Chi Minh Trail during the American war, is now a staple on many tourists’ itineraries seeking access to some of the country’s most authentic minority culture.

One such popular tour takes tourists along the legendary Truong Son route, to visit historical sites such as Ro village, Giang wharf, Kham Duc airport, Hoi village, Lo Xo hill, and Monique waterfall.

Tourists will also have a chance to visit and learn about the traditional carnivals and customs of ethnic minorities who have settled along the Truong Son route. Unique performances featuring “Cong Chieng” gongs and bamboo instruments are particularly exciting.

In Gung village, 80 km east of Da Nang city, tourists can visit the village’s Guoi house and listen to 80-year-old artist Ating Veh lecture about the preservation of traditional art. He also plays several of the traditional instruments for the audience.

Arriving at Giang wharf and Ro village where Co Tu and Gie Trieng people live, tourists are likely to be mesmerized by the dances that ethnic girls will perform in their traditional dress.

The people of Gie Trieng, Co Tu, and Ca Dong are well known for their sacred offering ceremony marking a successful harvest in May and the Cor people in Tra My district have their own ceremony in which a buffalo is offered to the deity at the end of the harvest.

As well, the Bh’nong people in Kham Duc district participate in a victory festival with the unique custom of “seizing husbands” with pole decoration and a buffalo sacrifice as well.

In addition, Nam Giang and Dong Giang districts offer original Vietnamese food like “lam” rice cooked in bamboo, “ba kich” medicinal wine, and “ta vat” wine fermented with “ta vat” fruit will intrigue tourist’s taste buds.

With the imposing Truong Son Mountain in the background of the newly launched Ho Chi Minh highway, tourist can make as many stopovers as they like at other sites such as Lo Xo hill, Monique waterfall, and several untouched forests.

Compiled by An Dien

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s